Mary, Queen of Scots

Mary, Queen of Scots, 1542 - 1587. Reigned 1542 - 1567 (In white mourning)Mary, Queen of Scots, 1542 - 1587. Reigned 1542 - 1567 (In white mourning) Mary, Queen of Scots: The Farewell to FranceMary, Queen of Scots: The Farewell to France Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley, 1545 - 1567. Consort of Mary, Queen of ScotsHenry Stuart, Lord Darnley, 1545 - 1567. Consort of Mary, Queen of Scots The Murder of David RizzioThe Murder of David Rizzio James Hepburn, 4th Earl of Bothwell, c 1535 - 1578. Third husband of Mary Queen of ScotsJames Hepburn, 4th Earl of Bothwell, c 1535 - 1578. Third husband of Mary Queen of Scots Scene from the Life of Mary, Queen of Scots. Mary Led through the Streets of Edinburgh after the Battle of Carberry HillScene from the Life of Mary, Queen of Scots. Mary Led through the Streets of Edinburgh after the Battle of Carberry Hill Mary, Queen of Scots Escaping from Lochleven CastleMary, Queen of Scots Escaping from Lochleven Castle The Execution of Mary, Queen of Scots, 1542 - 1587The Execution of Mary, Queen of Scots, 1542 - 1587 Mary, Queen of Scots, 1542 - 1587. Reigned 1542 - 1567Mary, Queen of Scots, 1542 - 1587. Reigned 1542 - 1567

Unknown

James Hepburn, 4th Earl of Bothwell, c 1535 - 1578. Third husband of Mary Queen of Scots
1566

On 19 June 1566 Mary gave birth to Prince James at Edinburgh Castle. Darnley had served his purpose by providing an heir and the Lords were already plotting to remove him from power for denying his role in the murder of Rizzio.

On 10 February 1567 an explosion took place in the house at Kirk o’Field where Darnley was recuperating from an illness. Darnley was found dead in the garden and appeared to have been strangled. Despite a lack of real evidence, the person generally held responsible was James Hepburn, 4th Earl of Bothwell. He was a swashbuckling military man who had gained Mary’s trust, although his motives were questionable. He was tried for the assassination but was cleared and within months he and Mary were married.

  • Credits Purchased 1917
  • Medium Oil on copper
  • Size Diameter: 3.70 cm

Did you know?

Following her death Mary’s body was embalmed, sealed in a lead coffin and left at Fotheringhay for a five months to prevent loyal Catholics retrieving relics of her as a martyr.