Changing Lives

Robert Owen, 1771 - 1858. Pioneer socialistRobert Owen, 1771 - 1858. Pioneer socialist Design for the Dean Orphanage, EdinburghDesign for the Dean Orphanage, Edinburgh Rev. Thomas Chalmers, 1780 - 1847. Preacher and social reformerRev. Thomas Chalmers, 1780 - 1847. Preacher and social reformer Landscape with ruinLandscape with ruin Close No. 101 High Street, GlasgowClose No. 101 High Street, Glasgow Three Studies for the Decoration of the first Mortuary Chapel, the Royal Hospital for Sick Children, EdinburghThree Studies for the Decoration of the first Mortuary Chapel, the Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Edinburgh Pitch and TossPitch and Toss Children and Chalked Wall 3Children and Chalked Wall 3 Sir Basil Urwin Spence, 1907 - 1976. ArchitectSir Basil Urwin Spence, 1907 - 1976. Architect TenderTender

Thomas Annan

Close No. 101 High Street, Glasgow
1868
Between 1800 and 1860 the population of Glasgow increased more than five-fold to around 420,000. While the richer citizens moved to the suburbs, the influx of migrants from Ireland and the Highlands caused massive overpopulation in the inner city. There were two types of working-class housing; the ‘made down houses' - former middle class homes where each room might house an entire family - and traditional tenements, often without running water or sanitation. In 1866 the City Improvement Trust was tasked with demolishing the old buildings and replacing them with wider roads and larger tenements. Although these slum clearances in part shifted the problem of overcrowding to other areas, they did wipe out epidemic diseases such as cholera and typhus.
  • Credits Purchased 1986
  • Medium Albumen print from wet collodion negative
  • Size 28.40 x 22.50 cm

Did you know?

During the 1870s, Edinburgh’s Old Town went through a similar slum clearance programme. Like Thomas Annan in Glasgow, Archibald Burns photographed many of Edinburgh’s old wynds and closes before their demolition.