Changing Lives

Robert Owen, 1771 - 1858. Pioneer socialistRobert Owen, 1771 - 1858. Pioneer socialist Design for the Dean Orphanage, EdinburghDesign for the Dean Orphanage, Edinburgh Rev. Thomas Chalmers, 1780 - 1847. Preacher and social reformerRev. Thomas Chalmers, 1780 - 1847. Preacher and social reformer Landscape with ruinLandscape with ruin Close No. 101 High Street, GlasgowClose No. 101 High Street, Glasgow Three Studies for the Decoration of the first Mortuary Chapel, the Royal Hospital for Sick Children, EdinburghThree Studies for the Decoration of the first Mortuary Chapel, the Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Edinburgh Pitch and TossPitch and Toss Children and Chalked Wall 3Children and Chalked Wall 3 Sir Basil Urwin Spence, 1907 - 1976. ArchitectSir Basil Urwin Spence, 1907 - 1976. Architect TenderTender

Mary Ann Knight

Robert Owen, 1771 - 1858. Pioneer socialist
1800

The Industrial Revolution brought dramatic changes to the way people earned money and made goods. Technological advances, such as the steam engine and mechanical spinning techniques, led to the establishment of factories, mines and cotton spinning mills throughout Britain. One of these mills was New Lanark, built on the River Clyde in Lanarkshire. Its owner, Robert Owen, became famous for his philanthropic approach to industrial working. He improved the living standards of his 2,500 workers, including some 500 children, by providing them with adequate housing, access to education and better working conditions. Contrary to the ideas of the time, Owen proved that it was possible to treat workers well and run a profitable business at the same time.

  • Credits Presented by Mrs James Watt 1953
  • Medium Watercolour on paper
  • Size 28.10 x 21.30 cm

Did you know?

New Lanark is still a living community today with around 200 permanent residents. It is now a World Heritage Site and receives more than 400,000 visitors a year. Find out more on the New Lanark website.