William Hogarth

(1697 - 1764)
William Hogarth Sarah Malcolm (died 1733) 1733

Biography

Hogarth was one of the most influential artists of the eighteenth century. He is credited with being the first artist in Europe to create art that represented and expressed a national identity. Born in London, Hogarth was apprenticed to a silver engraver for seven years, moving on to creating his own satirical prints. His series of prints such as 'A Rake's Progress' (1733-1735) had widespread appeal, particularly for the growing ranks of the middle-classes. A skilled draughtsman, Hogarth also painted historical and modern moral subjects.

Glossary terms

  • The printmaking technique in which an image is inscribed on a copper plate with a tool that cuts a groove in the surface. This groove holds the ink that creates the print when it is applied to paper. Also refers to the method of making an incision on a material such as glass.

  • A form of printmaking in which a metal plate is covered with a substance called a 'ground', usually wax, into which an image is drawn with a needle. Acid is applied, eroding the areas of the plate exposed but not the areas covered by wax. The action of the acid creates lines in the metal plate that hold the ink from which a print is made when the plate is pressed against paper under pressure.