Anne Redpath

The Indian Rug (or Red Slippers)

About this artwork

The vivid colours and flat patterning of this painting owe much to Matisse, while the 'tipped-up' perspective reflects Redpath's admiration for early Italian painting. Redpath was fascinated by colour and texture. In this painting, the pattern of the rug meshes with the shapes of the slippers and chair to such a degree that it is difficult to separate flat from three-dimensional form. Redpath's father designed tweed fabrics and her work has the sense of patterning sometimes found in textiles. She remarked: 'I do with a spot of red or yellow in a harmony of grey what my father did with his tweed.'

  • title: The Indian Rug (or Red Slippers)
  • accession number: GMA 932
  • artist: Anne RedpathScottish (1895 - 1965)
  • gallery: On Loan
  • object type: Painting
  • subject: Edinburgh School Still life
  • materials: Oil on plywood
  • date created: About 1942
  • measurements: 73.90 x 96.10 cm (framed: 91.50 x 113.50 x 6.20 cm)
  • credit line: Purchased 1965
  • copyright: © The Estate of Anne Redpath. All Rights Reserved 2016/ Bridgeman Images
  • photographer: Antonia Reeve

Anne Redpath

Anne Redpath

Redpath was born in Galashiels and studied at Edinburgh College of Art. In 1920 she married and moved to France, devoting much of the next fourteen years to her family and doing little painting. In the mid-1930s she returned to Scotland, settling in Hawick in the Borders. Redpath admired the French Post-Impressionist artists, such as Van Gogh and Gauguin, and also Matisse. From the 1950s, she became well known in the Scottish art world, specialising in landscapes, church interiors and still lifes painted in rich colours. Her work from the late 1950s responds to Abstract Expressionism in the free and expressive handling of paint.