About this artwork

George Hay was a soldier, who rose to the rank of Field-Marshal. He was born at Yester, near Gifford in East Lothian. He entered the army in 1804, the same year in which he succeeded to his hereditary title of 8th Marquess of Tweeddale. He saw service in Sicily and under Wellington in the Peninsular War, as well as in America. In 1842 he was appointed Governor of Madras. Tweeddale was noted for his physique and also as a horseman, and is said to have driven a coach from London to Haddington without a halt.

  • title:
    George Hay, 8th Marquess of Tweeddale, 1787 - 1876. Agriculturist
  • accession number:
    PG 1571
  • artist:
  • depicted:
  • gallery:
  • object type:
  • materials:
    Oil on canvas
  • date created:
    About 1850 - 1860
  • measurements:
    238.00 x 147.50 cm (framed: 288.77 x 172.87 x 10.50 cm)
  • credit line:
    Given by the Marquess of Tweeddale 1951
  • photographer:
    Antonia Reeve

Sir Francis Grant

Sir Francis Grant

By the time he was 26 years old, Francis Grant had spent his father’s inheritance of £10,000 on fox hunting and collecting paintings, and was in desperate need of a career. He decided to become an artist, and, despite having no formal training, he made rapid progress by copying old masterpieces lent to him by friends and family. At the time, it was remarkable and somewhat scandalous for a member of a landed family to become a professional portrait painter. His background did, however, give Grant easy access to fashionable Victorian society and portrait commissions. Although still a great lover of hunting, Grant’s success was huge and his output prolific: between 1831 and his death in 1878, approximately 800 paintings are recorded.