About this artwork

Francisco de Goya y Lucientes

Diego Velazquez

Francisco de Goya y Lucientes

Goya was an original and enigmatic artist, equally gifted as a painter and printmaker. His appointment in 1786 as painter to the Spanish King Charles IV followed a period in Madrid where he had moved from the north east of Spain. Goya's reputation was built on a variety of works, including religious and historical paintings, portraits and designs for the Royal Tapestry Works. A serious illness in 1793 left him permanently deaf. His etchings illustrate his vivid imagination, exploring man's folly in 'Los Caprichos' and recording man's brutality in 'The Disasters of War'. He spent his last years in Bordeaux, France.

Diego Velazquez

Velázquez became the leading Spanish artist of the seventeenth century. His outstanding skills were evident in his early works in Seville, and his talent for portraiture soon brought him to the attention of the court in Madrid. He moved there on his appointment as painter to King Philip IV in 1623. He was inspired by Titian's paintings in the Spanish royal collection and visited Italy twice. His innovative designs, and bold dazzling brushwork brought universal admiration. Velázquez was honoured as a knight for his artistic and diplomatic services in 1658.