About this artwork

This watercolour is a fine example of Sandby's early topographical studies. Bonnington Linn, above Lanark, is one of the three Falls of Clyde. The Clyde descends through a series of spectacular gorges, creating impressive waterfalls ('linns' in Scots) and the site became a popular attraction among tourists from the late eighteenth century. Sandby was a pioneer topographer and this drawing, which probably dates from the early 1750s, is important as one of the earliest depictions of a scene that went on to become so well known. The circular building, left of centre, was a dovecot which was later ruined. The falls attracted subsequent generations of artists, including Jacob More and J.M.W. Turner.

  • title:
    Bonnington Linn
  • accession number:
    D 146
  • artist:
    Paul SandbyEnglish (1731 - 1809)
  • gallery:
  • object type:
  • subject:
  • materials:
    Watercolour on paper (cut)
  • date created:
    Unknown
  • measurements:
    25.90 x 37.60 cm
  • credit line:
    David Laing Bequest to the Royal Scottish Academy transferred 1910

Paul Sandby

Paul Sandby