Robert Macqueen, Lord Braxfield, 1722 - 1799. Lord Justice-Clerk
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Robert Macqueen, Lord Braxfield, 1722 - 1799. Lord Justice-Clerk about 1798

On Display PORTRAIT GALLERY

  • Scottish Art
Lord Braxfield was said to be the best lawyer in Scotland, an expert in intricate legal questions arising out of the 1745 Rising. His later fame owes more to his reputation as a 'hanging judge'. Reactionary in politics and a hard drinker, he was notorious for uttering such memorable phrases as 'Hang a thief when he's young, and he'll no steal when he's auld'. Raeburn painted Braxfield when he was dying, and little more than a shadow of the man described in his prime as being like 'a formidable blacksmith'.

Glossary Open

1745 Rising

An attempt by followers of Prince Charles Edward Stuart (or 'Bonnie Prince Charlie') to reclaim the British throne for the Stuart dynasty. The Prince landed in the Outer Hebrides from France in July 1745. With the support of many Highland chiefs he gathered an army and marched south. The rebels had significant victories against the Hanoverian troops and reached as far as Derby. There they turned back, unsure of their ability to take London, and were pursued by government forces. The final battle was held at Culloden in 1746 where Bonnie Prince Charlie was decisively beaten and hopes of a Jacobite restoration were dashed.

1745 Rising

Details

  • Acc. No. PG 1615
  • Medium Oil on canvas
  • Size 120.60 x 100.30 cm (framed: 150.00 x 127.60 x 10.00 cm)
  • Credit Purchased 1954