Prince Charles Edward Stuart, 1720 - 1788
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Prince Charles Edward Stuart, 1720 - 1788 1745
  • Scottish Art
Medals and miniatures played an important role in expressing and encouraging loyalty to the exiled Stuart dynasty. Both forms are small and easily concealed, an important consideration given that supporting the Stuarts was a treasonable offence in Britain (although the authorities rarely prosecuted makers or owners of Jacobite imagery). Miniature portraits helped ciculate the features of the young Stuart heirs, Charles and Henry. This picture shows Charles at the time of the rising of 1745. The likely artist, the engraver Robert Strange, accompanied Charles during the invasion, and even designed banknotes for the envisaged Jacobite regime. The engraving shows Charles wearing the Order of the Garter.

Glossary Open

1745 Rising

An attempt by followers of Prince Charles Edward Stuart (or 'Bonnie Prince Charlie') to reclaim the British throne for the Stuart dynasty. The Prince landed in the Outer Hebrides from France in July 1745. With the support of many Highland chiefs he gathered an army and marched south. The rebels had significant victories against the Hanoverian troops and reached as far as Derby. There they turned back, unsure of their ability to take London, and were pursued by government forces. The final battle was held at Culloden in 1746 where Bonnie Prince Charlie was decisively beaten and hopes of a Jacobite restoration were dashed.

Engraving

The printmaking technique in which an image is inscribed on a copper plate with a tool that cuts a groove in the surface. This groove holds the ink that creates the print when it is applied to paper. Also refers to the method of making an incision on a material such as glass.

Jacobite

Jacobitism was a movement to restore the descendants of the Stuart King James VII and II to the British throne. The first claimant, Prince James Francis Edward (known as 'the Old Pretender') was exiled first in France, then Italy, from where he planned unsuccessful attempts to claim the throne. His son Prince Charles Edward (known as 'Bonnie Prince Charlie' or 'the Young Pretender') famously invaded Britain in 1745, but after some military successes was finally defeated at Culloden in 1746.

Miniature

A painting or drawing, usually a portrait, on a very small scale. These were popular prior to the invention of photographic portraits in the 19th century.

Order of the Garter

The most senior British Order of Chivalry, founded by Edward III in 1348. It now consists of 24 knights along with royal knights and some foreign monarchs. The badge of the order comprises the St George's Cross within a blue garter (the original emblem of the order), surrounded by radiating silver beams.

The Stuarts (The Stewarts)

The Stewarts / Stuarts were a Scottish royal dynasty that began with Robert II in the late fourteenth century. In 1603, with the Union of the Crowns of Scotland and England, James VI became James I of England. The Stuart reign saw a brief interruption with the republican Commonwealth due to the English Civil War, which followed Charles I’s execution in 1649, but it was restored in 1660 with Charles II as king. After the 1707 Acts of Union, the Stuarts became the heads of state of the newly created Great Britain. However, with childless Queen Anne’s death in 1714 the crown passed to the House of Hanover. The variant in spelling, from Stewart to Stuart, was due to Mary, Queen of Scots adopting the latter, French spelling, when she lived in France. This became the standard for future generations.

1745 Rising, Engraving, Jacobite, Miniature, Order of the Garter, The Stuarts (The Stewarts)

Details

  • Acc. No. SP IV 123.20
  • Medium Line engraving on paper
  • Size 25.70 x 18.40 cm
  • Credit Given by Charles Ffoulkes 1931