John Drummond, 4th titular Duke of Perth, 1714 - 1747. Jacobite
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John Drummond, 4th titular Duke of Perth, 1714 - 1747. Jacobite 1739
  • Scottish Art
Drummond was a Jacobite army officer and the son of a Jacobite nobleman. Born in France, he raised the Royal Ecossais under his command in 1743-4. This regiment would be the backbone of France’s contribution to the Jacobite Rising of 1745. After the disastrous Battle of Culloden, Drummond returned to France. He inherited the Jacobite title of fourth duke of Perth after his brother’s death. His promising French army career was cut short when he died of a fever after the siege of Bergen op Zoom in 1747. This portrait is the main surviving image of the duke. It was painted in 1739, when Drummond was a member of the Society of Young Gentlemen Travellers in Rome.

Glossary Open

1745 Rising

An attempt by followers of Prince Charles Edward Stuart (or 'Bonnie Prince Charlie') to reclaim the British throne for the Stuart dynasty. The Prince landed in the Outer Hebrides from France in July 1745. With the support of many Highland chiefs he gathered an army and marched south. The rebels had significant victories against the Hanoverian troops and reached as far as Derby. There they turned back, unsure of their ability to take London, and were pursued by government forces. The final battle was held at Culloden in 1746 where Bonnie Prince Charlie was decisively beaten and hopes of a Jacobite restoration were dashed.

Battle of Culloden

A battle fought on Culloden Moor near Inverness in 1746 between supporters of the exiled House of Stuart - led by the Young Pretender, Prince Charles Edward Stuart - and government troops led by the Duke of Cumberland. The government victory effectively brought the 1745 Jacobite Rebellion to an end and resulted in a repression of Highland culture as punishment.

Jacobite

Jacobitism was a movement to restore the descendants of the Stuart King James VII and II to the British throne. The first claimant, Prince James Francis Edward (known as 'the Old Pretender') was exiled first in France, then Italy, from where he planned unsuccessful attempts to claim the throne. His son Prince Charles Edward (known as 'Bonnie Prince Charlie' or 'the Young Pretender') famously invaded Britain in 1745, but after some military successes was finally defeated at Culloden in 1746.

1745 Rising, Battle of Culloden, Jacobite

Details

  • Acc. No. PG 1597
  • Medium Oil on canvas
  • Size 61.50 x 46.60 cm (framed: 72.00 x 57.20 x 7.50 cm)
  • Credit Purchased 1953