Natura Morta [Still Life]
© DACS 2004

Reference URL

Natura Morta [Still Life] 1962
In Morandi's still-life paintings, the artist used the same objects repeatedly; the subject was secondary to the manner of representation. After 1950 his style became increasingly abstract. In this painting, the objects are grouped together in the centre of the composition, as if in self-protection, and are painted with a nervous, quivering line. Morandi is dealing primarily with shape, space and colour, and seems to avoid all hint of symbolism or narrative. However, his choice of subject matter and manner of presentation suggest qualities of modesty, reflection and silence.

Glossary Open

Abstract art

Art in which there is no attempt to represent anything existing in the world, particularly used of the 20th century onwards. ‘Abstraction’ refers to the process of making images that may in part derive from the visible world but which are reduced to basic formal elements.

Composition

The arrangement of different elements in a work of art.

Still life

A painting, drawing or photograph depicting inanimate objects.

Symbolism

The representation of subjects or ideas by use of a device or motif to create underlying meaning. A literary and artistic movement that originated in France and spread through much of Europe in the late 19th century. There was no consistent style but rather an appeal to the idea of the artist as mystic or visionary and the desire to express a world beyond superficial appearances.

Abstract art, Composition, Still life, Symbolism

Details

  • Acc. No. GMA 906
  • Medium Oil on canvas
  • Size 30.50 x 30.60 cm (framed: 47.00 x 47.00 x 6.00 cm)
  • Credit Purchased 1965