Prince James Francis Edward Stuart, 1688 - 1766. Son of James VII and II
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Prince James Francis Edward Stuart, 1688 - 1766. Son of James VII and II 1727 - 1728 (after original of 1725)
  • Scottish Art
Prince James Francis Edward Stuart was the son of the exiled King James II and VII. On the death of his father in 1701 he was proclaimed King by his Jacobite supporters but attempts at regaining the thrones of England and Scotland failed. After the unsuccessful invasion of 1715 James was forced to live in Avignon, which was then Papal territory, until the pope offered him refuge in Rome, where he lived until his death. This painting is a copy of a portrait by Martin van Meytens, made in Rome as one of a pair – the other being of James’s wife Maria Clementina. Painted after the birth of their second son Henry, they were mutual presents, each to be hung in the other’s private rooms. Several copies of these works were produced to be given as presents to Jacobite supporters.

Glossary Open

Jacobite

Jacobitism was a movement to restore the descendants of the Stuart King James VII and II to the British throne. The first claimant, Prince James Francis Edward (known as 'the Old Pretender') was exiled first in France, then Italy, from where he planned unsuccessful attempts to claim the throne. His son Prince Charles Edward (known as 'Bonnie Prince Charlie' or 'the Young Pretender') famously invaded Britain in 1745, but after some military successes was finally defeated at Culloden in 1746.

Jacobite

Details

  • Acc. No. PG 1836
  • Medium Oil on canvas
  • Size 76.40 x 63.50 cm (framed: 90.70 x 78.50 x 5.70 cm)
  • Credit Bequeathed by Miss B.S. Parr 1956