Scottish National Gallery

The Scottish National Gallery is home to Scotland's greatest collection of European paintings and sculpture from the Renaissance to Post-Impressionism, and is one of the very finest galleries of its size in the world.

At the heart of the National Gallery's collection is a group of Old Master paintings acquired in the first half of the nineteenth century that includes masterpieces by Jacopo Bassano, Van Dyck and Tiepolo.

The Gallery has made many outstanding acquisitions since it received its own purchase grant in 1903, such as Gauguin's Vision after the Sermon, Velázquez's Old Woman Cooking Eggs, El Greco's Fábula, Bernini's sculpture of Carlo Antonio dal Pozzo, Botticelli's Virgin Adoring the Sleeping Christ Child and Antonio Canova's Three Graces, shared with the Victoria & Albert Museum in London.

The Gallery's Impressionist and Post-Impressionist holdings include two fine Gauguins, Monet's Haystacks and Cézanne's Montagne Sainte-Victoire.

Over the years, the Gallery has benefited from remarkable loans and gifts of works of art. On loan from Her Majesty The Queen is the Trinity Altarpiece by Hugo van der Goes.

In 1945, a superb group of paintings was placed on long-term loan by the Duke of Sutherland. Referred to as the Bridgewater Loan, this collection includes masterpieces by Raphael, Titian and Rembrandt, as well as Poussin's celebrated Seven Sacraments.

The Gallery also boasts the largest and most comprehensive collection of Scottish paintings in the world. All of the major names in Scottish art - including Ramsay, Raeburn, Wilkie and McTaggart - are represented in depth. Among the best-loved works are Raeburn's Reverend Robert Walker Skating on Duddingston Loch and Ramsay's portrait of his second wife, Margaret Lindsay.

The collection of watercolours, prints and drawings boasts over 20,000 items, and is particularly rich in Scottish, Italian and Netherlandish drawings.