Changing Lives

Robert Owen, 1771 - 1858. Pioneer socialistRobert Owen, 1771 - 1858. Pioneer socialist Design for the Dean Orphanage, EdinburghDesign for the Dean Orphanage, Edinburgh Rev. Thomas Chalmers, 1780 - 1847. Preacher and social reformerRev. Thomas Chalmers, 1780 - 1847. Preacher and social reformer Landscape with ruinLandscape with ruin Close No. 101 High Street, GlasgowClose No. 101 High Street, Glasgow Three Studies for the Decoration of the first Mortuary Chapel, the Royal Hospital for Sick Children, EdinburghThree Studies for the Decoration of the first Mortuary Chapel, the Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Edinburgh Pitch and TossPitch and Toss Children and Chalked Wall 3Children and Chalked Wall 3 Sir Basil Urwin Spence, 1907 - 1976. ArchitectSir Basil Urwin Spence, 1907 - 1976. Architect TenderTender

Phoebe Anna Traquair

Three Studies for the Decoration of the first Mortuary Chapel, the Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Edinburgh
1885
While some strived to improve living standards, others were more concerned with the moral and spiritual wellbeing of the working classes. Intellectuals and artists such as John Ruskin and William Morris believed in ‘moral improvement' through exposure to art and design. Morris founded the Arts and Crafts movement, which promoted the simplicity and honesty of craftsmanship and design from pre-industrial times, and which sought to integrate art and beauty in everyday life. In Scotland, the Edinburgh Social Union aimed: ‘to beautify the homes of the poor' and ‘to teach them to do so themselves'. In 1885 the Union commissioned a programme of mural decorations in public buildings, which included Phoebe Traquair's paintings in the mortuary chapel of the Royal Hospital for Sick Children.
  • Credits Bequest of the artist 1936
  • Medium Oil on canvas
  • Size 24.80 x 20.00 cm