A Whispering Paradise (or 'Earth and Heaven')
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A Whispering Paradise (or 'Earth and Heaven') 1951
  • Scottish Art
The symmetrical composition of this large work is particularly characteristic of Wilson’s later style, as is the dramatic use of colour on a black background. From the early 1940s the artist began to experiment with a ‘landscape’ style, which is not landscape in the true sense, but the picture plane is divided into horizontal bands. Totem poles are a favourite motif of Wilson, influenced by his time spent living and travelling in Canada. The central construction may be a castle or more likely a fountain. Fountains occur frequently in Wilson’s work, a reminder of his childhood spent in the public parks of Glasgow.

Glossary Open

Art Brut

A term used by the French artist Jean Dubuffet to describe art created spontaneously. He identified this practice among psychiatric patients and children. It is also called 'outsider art'.

Composition

The arrangement of different elements in a work of art.

Surrealism

A literary and artistic movement founded by the poet André Breton in 1924. Many of the associated artists, such as Max Ernst and Jean Arp, had previously been involved with Dadaism. The movement sought to challenge conventions through the exploration of the subconscious mind, invoking the power of dreams and elements of chance. Cultural hierarchies were challenged by the combination of diverse elements in collages and sculptural assemblages. The movement is also notable for the collaborations between artists and writers evident in the Surrealists' many publications.

Art Brut, Composition, Surrealism

Details

  • Acc. No. GMA 1997
  • Medium Crayon and pen and ink on black paper
  • Size 90.20 x 154.40 cm (framed: 109.50 x 177.10 x 4.50 cm)
  • Credit Presented by Mr and Mrs Robert Lewin 1978