Prince Charles Edward Stuart, 1720 - 1788. Eldest son of Prince James Francis Edward Stuart
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Prince Charles Edward Stuart, 1720 - 1788. Eldest son of Prince James Francis Edward Stuart About 1785

On Display PORTRAIT GALLERY

  • Scottish Art
After the defeat of the Jacobite forces at Culloden in 1746 and the prince’s subsequent flight to France, Charles repeatedly tried to rally French support for an invasion on English soil. Despite his father’s pleas, French support never materialised and the Young Pretender was eventually expelled. After years of moving around the continent, in 1774 Charles and his young wife Louisa settled in Florence. By this time he was depressed, abusive and suffering from drink-related ill health. Charles and Louisa separated in 1784, and that same year Charles legitimised his daughter Charlotte by his mistress, and recognised her as his heir. This portrait was painted in Rome during the last years of the sitter's life. At this time Hamilton also portrayed Charles’s daughter in a similar format.

Glossary Open

Jacobite

Jacobitism was a movement to restore the descendants of the Stuart King James VII and II to the British throne. The first claimant, Prince James Francis Edward (known as 'the Old Pretender') was exiled first in France, then Italy, from where he planned unsuccessful attempts to claim the throne. His son Prince Charles Edward (known as 'Bonnie Prince Charlie' or 'the Young Pretender') famously invaded Britain in 1745, but after some military successes was finally defeated at Culloden in 1746.

Jacobite

Details

  • Acc. No. PG 622
  • Medium Oil on canvas
  • Size 25.70 x 22.00 cm (framed: 35.20 x 30.50 x 3.50 cm)
  • Credit Purchased 1903