A woman and a horse, let someone else master them (La mujer y el potro, que los dome otro), Plate 10 of Los Disparates
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A woman and a horse, let someone else master them (La mujer y el potro, que los dome otro), Plate 10 of Los Disparates Etched about 1819 - 1823 (published 1864)
Los Disparates (or Proverbios as they are sometimes called) is a group of twenty-two prints which Goya produced between about 1819 and 1823. These dark, unsettling satires correspond in mood to the works or his final years, known as the ‘Black Paintings’. There is little certain information about the prints’ intended order or their meaning. This one is probably based on an old tale in which a man, who has been turned into a horse, falls in love with a woman. He then kills her husband and abducts her. Goya showed the horse rearing on its hind legs. The animal is powerful and untamed, the embodiment of animal instinct and unbridled sexual passion. The features of the landscape behind assume the form of strange monsters.

Glossary Open

Drypoint

A printmaking technique that uses a needle to etch an image directly onto a copper plate. The resulting raised surface, or burr, which holds the ink used in the printmaking process produces a soft, velvety effect.

Etching

A form of printmaking in which a metal plate is covered with a substance called a 'ground', usually wax, into which an image is drawn with a needle. Acid is applied, eroding the areas of the plate exposed but not the areas covered by wax. The action of the acid creates lines in the metal plate that hold the ink from which a print is made when the plate is pressed against paper under pressure.

Print

An image pressed or stamped onto paper or fabric. This encompasses a wide variety of techniques, usually produced in multiples, although one-off prints, known as monoprints, are also included. The term is also applied to photographic images.

Drypoint, Etching, Print

Details

  • Acc. No. GOYA.104
  • Medium Etching, burnished aquatint and drypoint on paper
  • Size 24.50 x 35.00 cm
  • Credit Purchased 1959