The Facade of Abbotsford, the Home of Sir Walter Scott, seen through the Entrance Gate. Study for the Engraving to Lockhart's 'Memoirs of the Life of Sir Walter Scott'
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The Facade of Abbotsford, the Home of Sir Walter Scott, seen through the Entrance Gate. Study for the Engraving to Lockhart's 'Memoirs of the Life of Sir Walter Scott' Dated 1832
  • Scottish Art
Walter Scott employed the architect William Atkinson (c.1773 - 1839) to build Abbotsford House in Roxburghshire. It was for Scott’s own pleasure and its strong theatrical elements provided a perfect setting for his collection of antiquities. Begun in 1816 and extended after 1822, Abbotsford started a trend for the 'castle-style' buildings of the Scottish Baronial Revival. It was built in two stages after a prolonged process of planning. It reflected Scott's passion for the medieval and had many medieval carvings and idiosyncratic features incorporated into the design. The main entrance was based on the entrance porch to Linlithgow Palace, the Gothic chimney piece in the entrance hall copied from stone seats at Melrose Abbey, and the hall's wood panelling came from Dunfermline Auld Kirk.

Glossary Open

Gothic

The art and architectural style that dominated Western Europe during the medieval period. Its buildings are characterised by pointed arches, strong vertical lines and elaborate window structures. The style was widely revived in the 19th century.

Scottish Baronial Style

The Scottish Baronial style represents a nineteenth century revival of architectural forms used in old Scottish tower houses, which were originally castellated for protection. The flourishing of this new style was a romantic expression of Scotland’s architectural history and tradition at a time when national identity was an important agenda in Scotland. The style was predominantly used for large country houses, and incorporated architectural features such as turrets, crowsteps, steep roofs, and the use of vast hewn stone.

Gothic, Scottish Baronial Style

Details

  • Acc. No. D 2701
  • Medium Watercolour and pencil with some scratching out on paper
  • Size 24.60 x 19.90 cm
  • Credit William Findlay Watson Bequest 1881