Rocks at Ploumenach, Brittany
© Estate of Eileen Agar

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Rocks at Ploumenach, Brittany 1936 (printed later)
Agar first visited Brittany in 1936 after participating in the International Surrealist Exhibition in London. She spotted these rock-formations from the train and was intrigued by their unusual shape, describing them as 'enormous prehistoric monsters sleeping on the turf above the sea'. Agar may also have been influenced by her friend Paul Nash's photography of ancient sites such as Stonehenge and Avebury. Agar's photograph brings out the metamorphic imagery in the rocks, showing the poetic and comic qualities of the natural forms.

Glossary Open

Surrealism

A literary and artistic movement founded by the poet André Breton in 1924. Many of the associated artists, such as Max Ernst and Jean Arp, had previously been involved with Dadaism. The movement sought to challenge conventions through the exploration of the subconscious mind, invoking the power of dreams and elements of chance. Cultural hierarchies were challenged by the combination of diverse elements in collages and sculptural assemblages. The movement is also notable for the collaborations between artists and writers evident in the Surrealists' many publications.

Surrealism

Details

  • Acc. No. GMA 4350
  • Medium Silver gelatine print
  • Size 15.50 x 15.50 cm (paper 15.90 x 15.60 cm)
  • Credit Presented by Mrs Virginia Zabriskie of Zabriskie Gallery, New York 2000